Common Holiday Season Injuries

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For many the holiday season is a time for great joy and celebration, but often times that joyousness comes with increased risk for accident and injury. Understanding some the most common holiday season injuries can help you be more aware of potentially dangerous circumstances, and might keep you and your loved ones safe.

Frequently holiday injuries occur while people are decorating. One of the major causes of injury while decorating is falling. When hanging decorations be sure to use a stable step stool or ladder rather than climbing on furniture. If using a high ladder don’t do it alone. Candles and lights can also be another decorative hazard. Make sure that all open flames are never left unattended. If you’re going to have a Christmas tree try to choose a tree with healthy green needles, as dry dead needles are much more flammable. Consider replacing your lights if they are old or frayed, as electrical shock is another regular decorating injury.

The holiday season also brings with it a rise in motor vehicle accidents. Between Thanksgiving and New Year there is often an uptake in social events putting more people on the road at night. Drivers during the holidays can be guilty of drowsy driving, stressed driving, and driving while intoxicated all of which can impair a driver’s ability to operate a vehicle correctly. With more drivers on the road, some of whom may be impaired the risk for accident and injury is increased. If your driving is impaired in anyway, don’t get behind the wheel.

Some of our most beloved holiday traditions revolve around food, so preparing our feasts with care is important. The CDC recommends washing hands and surfaces often while preparing food, as well as keeping raw meats, fish, and poultry away from ready to eat food. Additionally, fire safety should be a top priority when cooking holiday meals. The National Fire Protection Association reports that “Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.” Always be vigilant when cooking, especially when trying new methods. Keeping a fire extinguisher in the kitchen and another near the tree can be lifesaving in the event of a Holiday fire.

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